D1 A5: Gallery visit: Fabric at the Holburne museam and Vicotria Museaum, Bath

I recently visited the Holburne Museum and Victoria Museum in Bath (http://www.holburne.org/). This houses the collection of 19th-century collector Sir William Holburne. The museum has a range of items from porcelain to paintings. I focussed on the paintings. In particular, the approached to painting/drawing fabric. This was going to be an important element of my final assignment.

This is more a collection of reference material’s rather than a critical analysis.

Interesting composition and use how the black fabric is rendered. SOmething strange going on with the perspective of the light. I like the way it is set at the eye level of the wife – making here the focus of the picture – it seems a bit off to me though.

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A lovely example of painting satin.

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Beautiful work on the white nightgown and up close you get a real feel for the gold thread on the bedclothes.

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The course brushwork here gives the impression of a thick, well-used apron.

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In complete contrast to the rugged working baker – these fine ladies have beautifully rendered satin and lace dresses.

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This one caught my eye partly because of the atmospheric use fo candlelight and the impact on the way the folds are painted, but also because it is a mirror image of a painting I from the school of Peter Paul Ruben’s painting I saw at the Mauritshuis in the Hague. The caption there said that Rubens kept this painting in his school as a teaching aid for his students to copy. My guess is Schalcken studied there – or at least saw this painting. It is an accurate depiction and so I assume it was copied first hand rather than from memory. What is interesting is that it has been flipped horizontally. That seems both strange and unnecessarily complicated – perhaps done for the challenge. Another interesting thought though is if something like a camera obscura was used. I think that would have flipped the image in this way.

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Peter Paul Rubens, Old Woman and Boy with Candles, c. 1616 – 1617

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